Map and Guide for Steelhead Fishing in Cattaraugus Creek

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Cattaraugus Creek offers over 34 miles of steelhead angling opportunities from Lake Erie to the Springville Dam. A portion of the stream and its lower tributaries are on Seneca Nation of Indian Lands, so if you plan to fish there, you will need a license for the Reservation.

The "Catt" is a large stream, averaging over 100 feet wide and varying from slow water near Lake Erie to boulder filled rapids in the scenic Zoar Valley Area upstream of Gowanda. The Cattaraugus rarely runs clear due to fine suspended sediment from numerous exposed clay banks along its course.

While the majority of the steelhead in the Cattaraugus Creek are the result of smolt stockings by NYS-DEC, there is significant natural reproduction that adds to the fishery. Recent studies found that as much as 25% of the steelhead are of wild origin. Projects are being planned and implemented to increase the contribution of wild steelhead in the Cattaraugus system.

Several tributaries to Cattaraugus Creek offer steelhead opportunities in a small stream setting. Some of these streams include; Clear Creek and its North Branch, a short section of the S. Branch of Cattaraugus Creek, Derby Brook, Coon Brook and Spooner Creek. The N. Branch Clear Creek and Spooner Creek are closed to fishing from January 1- March 31 to protect spawning fish.

This gives a brief overview of the Cattaraugus Creek fishery. For more detailed information, call the Allegany DEC office or the Lake Erie Fisheries Unit at (716) 366-0228.

Access

The map shows the approximate locations of areas open to the public for fishing. Please note that most of the stream and its tributaries are on private property or Seneca Nation of Indians Lands.

Preview of Cattaraugus Creek Map from NYS DEC

Steelhead Tackle

Steelhead in Cattaraugus Creek generally average 3-6 pounds, but fish from 8-12 pounds are common so fairly heavy equipment is required. Spinning rods of 7'-9' in length, capable of casting 1/2 ounce lures and using 6-12 lb. test lines are needed.
Fly rods from 8'-10' in length that handle 6-10 weight lines work well for landing these fish.

Catch and Release

The steelhead of Cattaraugus Creek are a magnificent resource that can be enjoyed by anglers more than once. By voluntarily releasing some or all of the steelhead you catch you can help to ensure high catch rates for yourself and other anglers throughout the season.

Fly-Fishing Guides

Cattaraugus Creek Outfitters can take you on a fly-fishing trip on the Cattaraugus Creek. Read more at http://www.ccoFlyFishing.com/guidedtrips.html

Travel Guide

Enchanted Mountains of Cattaraugus County Travel Guide for 2018It's a full 56-page comprehensive guide, highlighting the activities and attractions in our County and it's FREE!!

View the visitor's guide online

or

request that the Enchanted Mountains guide

be snail mailed to you for FREE!

NYAGT Geocaching Trails

Top 10 site for Steelhead Fishing

Cattaraugus Creek has been listed in the top 10 sites for Steelhead Fishing (rainbow trout fishing) by 2 outdoor magazines. Steelhead Trout AKA Rainbow trout are very similar to Salmon in both taste and habits. Unlike other areas of the United States, our native Rainbow trout (Steelhead Trout) spend a majority of time in Lake Erie a freshwater lake and spawn in the Cattaraugus Creek and other tributaries.

The following is from the New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation's article "Steelhead Fishing in Lake Erie Tributaries"

Lake Erie's tributary streams, both big and small, receive an annual run of migratory rainbow trout called "steelhead." From October through April, thousands of steelhead ascend New York's Lake Erie tributaries on their mission to spawn. Excellent fishing opportunities await any angler who wishes to try their hand at steelhead fishing. Between the acrobatic leaps, long drag-screaming runs and rod quaking head shakes, the fight of an early run steelhead is a truly exhilarating experience.

Read more about Steelhead/Rainbow fishing on the Cattaraugus Creek

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